Vigilantism and Supervillains

With all of these Supers around, you would think that there would be a host of self-proclaimed super heroes and villains running around – but there aren't.  At least, not anymore.  But that wasn't always the case.  The United States went through a phase of battling Supers, fighting it out between themselves and for or against various criminal organizations, in the 80s and early 90s.  They were interesting times, but they caused a lot of political turmoil and a lot of innocent people got hurt in the process – enough that the price of Supers intervening to clear up crime could cost as much, or more, harm as the crime itself!  These days, vigilantism is illegal once more, and the use of Gifts in the commission of a crime is an additional federal offense.  This is not to say Super vigilantes no longer exist – but many people who publically proclaim themselves to be a Super hero, actually have mental health or other issues.  Meanwhile, the bad guys and gals still do bad things – with or without the use of Gifts.

In some cities there are a few teams and lone wolf supers, usually those with more major powers, who dedicate themselves to righting wrongs or committing felonies, despite the risks. These groups often wear costumes (either to identify themselves as heroes, while keeping their civilian identities a secret; because the costume offers some enhancements; or simply to look kick-ass and gain a reputation) and the local law often responds by trying to shut them down; turning a blind eye; or even supporting a favorite – usually the kind of response might be as simple as the attitude of the local Mayor to supers or to an individual super (either supporting someone who is fighting for the city or supporting a villain in return for wealth, favors, or position).

Vigilantism and Supervillains

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